How to care for your chickens in winter

Natasha Larry Books

They Don’t Need a Heater

People keep asking if they need to put in a heater in the chicken coop for winter warmth. The answer is simply no. They group together for warmth. Furthermore, don’t seal up the coop totally. Ventilation is vital to avoid moisture development.

Utilize Deep Litter to Keep Them Warm

A profound litter method is to simply allow chicken poop and bedding material to build up in the coop over the spring, summer, and fall so that by winter you have approximately a foot of all that material on the floor of the coop. This, in turn, will radiate its very own warmth, thereby keeping the coop warm.

They May Not Lay Unless You Supplement Light

Generally, supplemental light is required in the event that you need to keep your customers or family eggs throughout the entire winter. Nonetheless, there are a few drawbacks to supplementing light – it can get the birds stressed up and affect their laying life. Before doing this, consider the pros and cons.

Feed Them Corn in the Evening to Keep Them Warm All Night

Treating your chickens to a meal of cracked corn before bed gives them something to process all through the night and this keeps them warm. ?

Hang a Head of Cabbage for a Chicken Play Toy

Much the same as people, chickens can get somewhat exhausted and stir-crazy in the winter. My chickens seem to get a bunch of joy when I hang a head of cabbage on a string in the coop. It gives them something to peck at while it flies around.

Make Them a Nice Sunroom

In case you’re stressed over your female birds not having enough space in the coop, you can construct a sort of clear plastic cold frame or nursery style expansion to your coop. They will move into it and have more space on pleasant days, and you can sit back and relax realizing they aren’t too stressed and having a nice time.

Petroleum Jelly on Combs and Wattles Protects from Frostbite

In very cold regions, you may find that breeds with vast wattles and combs are inclined to frostbite. You can cover their wattles and combs with petroleum jelly to protect them.

Chickens Don’t Like Snow

When the temperature drops down to 20 degrees Fahrenheit range, I noticed chickens don’t usually go out in the snow. You can dissipate roughage or straw on the ground and this will make it more tasteful for them. I also found out that when the temperature is in the 30s, they don’t seem to have a problem going out.

Chickens Don’t Have to Be Put Inside in Bad Weather

Chickens are smart enough to know when they ought to be outside and when they don’t want to. Let it be their choice.

Roosts Are Key

Chickens gave the tendency to perch together and fluff themselves out. This also helps them to keep warm. It likewise keeps them off the ground if it is cold. Ensure you provide them with enough space to roost comfortably.